Scroll down to the bottom of this page for NCEA Clarification Documents

Link to Internal Assessment: "Have we found a 'Woman of Means'?" http://www.tki.org.nz/e/search/results.php?1%3Aelem=DC.Subject.Classification&1%3Aval=NCEA%3BClassical%20Studies&1%3Avalop=AND&1%3Asearchtype=term&2%3Aelem=TKI.Level&2%3Aval=NCEA+Level+2&2%3Avalop=AND&2%3Asearchtype=term&xsl_lang=en&xsl_path=/search/results_e.php

RESOURCES
YOU'LL BE IN HEAVEN WITH ALL THE RESOURCES FOR YOUR RESEARCH ON THIS SITE http://www2.cnr.edu/home/sas/araia/worlds.html
http://www2.cnr.edu/home/sas/araia/class.html Evidence for Class of Women - Oh Yeah! This is great for your research
Grave Inscription for a Young Girl http://www2.cnr.edu/home/sas/araia/girl_sarcophagus.htmlGrave Inscription for a Young Girl http://www2.cnr.edu/home/sas/araia/caeciniabassa.html
Grave Inscription for a Young Girl/woman who had already been married.http://www2.cnr.edu/home/sas/araia/minucia.html
Grave Inscription for a Young Girl http://www2.cnr.edu/home/sas/araia/maconiana.html
Grave Inscription for a young Girl http://www2.cnr.edu/home/sas/araia/aelia_sabina.html
Women and Education http://www2.cnr.edu/home/sas/araia/learning.html with primary resource material that you can refer to in your

http://www.womenintheancientworld.com/women_in_ancient_rome.htm
All about the ancient Roman girls' childhood http://www2.cnr.edu/home/sas/araia/childhood.html
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Inscriptions/home.html#epitaphs Inscriptions!!
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2010/feb/26/roman-york-skeleton
http://ablemedia.com/ctcweb/consortium/gladiator6.html woman gladiator's grave

http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/secondary/SMIGRA*/Funus.html

http://www.digitalegypt.ucl.ac.uk/tarkhan/kaframmartomb99/index.html
http://www.digitalegypt.ucl.ac.uk/hawara1/roman/girlgrave.html

http://www.umich.edu/~kelseydb/Exhibits/Death_on_Display/index.html
http://www.umich.edu/~kelseydb/Exhibits/Death_on_Display/Cremation_Group/cremation.html
http://www.umich.edu/~kelseydb/Exhibits/Death_on_Display/Cremation_Group/gold.html
http://www.umich.edu/~kelseydb/Exhibits/Death_on_Display/Cremation_Group/tour.html

Clues about your "woman"
http://www.innominatesociety.com/Articles/Death%20and%20Disease%20in%20Ancient%20Rome.htm
http://www.umich.edu/~kelseydb/Exhibits/Death_on_Display/Text/inhumation.html

EXAMPLES OF ROMAN WOMEN'S NAMES
Index of Women Named in Latin Texts in
The Worlds of Roman Women and Companion
The names of fictitious women are in italics
Aelia Procula, daughter of P. Aelius Asclepiacus and Ulpia Priscilla (2nd century CE).
CIL 6.10958 (Childhood)
Aelia Sabina, freeborn daughter of freedman P. Aelius Trophimus and Longinia Sabina
(2nd century CE). CIL 6.10969 (Childhood)
Agrippina Maior, daughter of Marcus Agrippa and Julia; wife of Germanicus (c. 14 BCE-33 CE).
Cornelius Tacitus, Annales 1.33, 40, 69 (excerpts). (State)
Antonia Minor, daughter of Marcus Antonius and Octavia; wife of Drusus (36 BCE-37 CE).
Valerius Maximus, Facta et Dicta Memorabilia 4.3.3 (Marriage)
Arethusa, wife of Lycotas (lst c. BCE).
S. Propertius, Elegiae 4.3 (Marriage)
Atia, daughter of Marcus Atius Balbus; mother of Octavius (Augustus) and Octavia (d. 43/42 BCE).
Cornelius Tacitus, Dialogus de Oratoribus 28-29 (excerpts) (Family)
Aurelia, mother of J.Caesar; reported Clodius’ violation of the women’s festival of the Bona Dea (d. 54
BCE).
Cornelius Tacitus, Dialogus de Oratoribus 28-29 (excerpts) (Family)
Aurelia Agrippinae, wife of P. Aelius Myron (1st century BCE).
CIL 6.10742 (Family)
Aurelia Nais, seller of fish at the Emporium (2nd century CE).
CIL 9801, ILS 7500 (Work)
Aurelia Philematium, a freedwoman, wife of the butcher Hermia (1st century BCE).
ILS 1221, Funerary Inscription (Marriage)
Boudica, Queen of the Iceni, wife of King Prasutagus; led the largest revolt of British tribes
against the Romans (d. 61 CE).
Cornelius Tacitus, Annales XIV.34-35 (State)
Calpurnia, the young second or third wife of Pliny (fl. late 1st century CE.).
C. Plinius Caecilius Secundus (minor), Epistulae 4.19, 7.5, 8.10 (Learning, Marriage, Body).
Calpurnia Hispulla, the sister of Calpurnia’s dead father (fl. mid-late 1st century CE).
C. Plinius Caecilius Secundus (minor), Epistulae 4.19 (Learning)
Camilla, leader of the Volscian army of women which fought against the Trojans in Italy (fl. 12th century
BCE).
P. Vergilius Varo, Aeneis VII.803-817 (State)
Chloe, music girl from Thrace (late 1st century BCE).
Q. Horatius Flaccus, Carmina 3.9 (Flirtation)
Claudia, matrona (ca. 135-120 BCE).
ILS 8403, Funerary Inscription (Marriage)
Claudia Olympias, memorials to a patrona by her freedman and matrona by her husband (early 2nd
century CE)
CIL 6.15518-15519 (Class)
Claudia Peregrina, wife of Martial’s friend Pudens (lst c. CE).
M. Valerius Martialis, Epigrammata IV.13 (Marriage)
Claudia Piste, wife of Primus
CIL 6.15546 (Marriage)
Claudia Quinta, matrona who led the ship of the Magna Mater to Rome (fl. 204 BCE).
P. Ovidius Naso, Fasti 4.293-328, 343-344 (State)
Claudia Rufina, wife of Martial’s friend Pudens (fl. mid-late 1st century CE).
M. Valerius Martialis, Epigrammata 11.53 (Marriage)
Claudia Semne, wife of Marcus Ulpius Crotonensis (fl. 2nd century CE).
CIL 6.15592, 15593, 15504; ILS 8063 a, b, c (Marriage)
Claudia Syntyche, dedicator of an altar to the Magna Mater, Cybele (1st century CE ).
CIL 6.492, Votive Inscription (State)
Clodia Metelli, sister of P. Clodius, member of the powerful gens Claudia, wife of Metellus, girlfriend of
Caelius, perhaps the model for Catullus’ Lesbia (fl. Mid-1st century BCE).
M. Tullius Cicero, Pro Caelio 33-34 (Family)
Coelia Mascellina, daughter of Gn. Coelius Masculus; importer of wine and oil (mid-late 2nd century
CE).
Signaculum (inscribed bronze stamp) in Latin and Greek (Work)
Cornelia (1), daughter of P. Cornelius Scipio Africanus maior; wife of Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus;
mother of Sempronia, Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus (fl. 2nd century BCE).
M. Fabius Quintilianus, Institutio Oratoria 1.1.6 (Learning); Cornelius Tacitus, Dialogus de
Oratoribus 28-29 (excerpts), C. Nepos, De Viris Illustribus, frag. 1-2, Valerius Maximus,
Memorabilia IV.4 (Family)
Cornelia (2), daughter of Cornelius Scipio and Scribonia; wife of Paullus Aemilius Lepidus (d. 16 BCE).
S. Propertius, Elegiae 4.11 (excerpts) (Family)
Cornelia (3), wife of M. Aemilius Lepidus (1st century BCE).
Q. Asconius Pedianus, Ciceronis In Pisonem Enarratio Orationis 13 (Family)
Cornelia Metella, 5th and last wife of Pompey (1st century BCE).
M. Annaeus Lucan, De Bello Civili V. (Marriage)
Dido, Queen of Carthage, wife of Sychaeus, lover of Aeneas (f.l.12th century BCE)
P. Vergilius Varo, Aeneis IV.630-662 (State)
Do[c]ilosa, Docilina, Alogiosa, women of a family that swore an oath to Dea Sulis (2nd century CE)
Bath, Avon: Defixio #9
Domitia Decidiana, wife of Iulius Agricola; Tacitus’ mother-in-law (fl. 1st century CE).
Cornelius Tacitus, Agricola 6.1, 3 (Marriage)
Erotion, slave of Martial (1st century CE).
M. Valerius Martialis, Epigrammata V. 34 (Childhood)
Eucharis, singer and actress (2nd -1st century BCE).
ILS 5213, Funerary Inscription (Childhood)
Eumachia, priestess, public benefactor, and wife of M. Numistrius Fronto (1st century CE).
ILS 3785, 6368 (Religion)
Fortunata, wife of Trimalchio (mid 1st century CE).
C. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon 37, 67, 76 (excerpts) (Family)
Furia Spes, freedwoman and loving wife (1st-2d c. CE).
CIL 6.18817; ILS 8006
Galeria Copiola, actress (1st century BCE).
C. Plinius Secundus (maior), Naturalis Historia 7.48.158 (Work)
Gnome Pierinis, hairdresser (lst c. BCE).
CIL 6.9730, ILS 7419 (Work)
Gymnasium, daughter of Syra; a meretrix (early 2nd century BCE).
T. Maccius Plautus, Cistellaria 38-41, 123-4, 133-44 (Work)
Helvia, mother of Seneca (fl. 1st century CE).
L. Annaeus Seneca, Ad Helviam Matrem de Consolatione 14, 16, 19 (excerpts) (Family)
Hispala Faecenia, freedwoman, courtesan, heroine (fl. 186 BCE).
T. Livius, Ab Urbe Condita 39.9-10 (excerpts) (State)
Hortensia, eloquent daughter of the orator Q. Hortensius Hortalus (1st century BCE).
M. Fabius Quintilianus, Institutio Oratoria 1.1.6. (Learning); Valerius Maximus Factorum et
Dictorum Memorabilia 8.3.3 (Class, Learning)
Hygia, midwife (1st century CE).
CIL 6.6647 (Work)
Iaia Cyzicena, painter (1st century BCE).
C. Plinius Secundus (maior), Naturalis Historia 35.40.147-8 (Work)
Julia (1) , daughter of Julius Caesar and Cornelia; wife of Pompey (ca. 83-54 BCE).
Valerius Maximus, Facta et Dicta Memorabilia 4.6.4 (Body)
Julia (2), daughter of Octavian (Augustus) and Scribonia (39 BCE-CE 14).
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Vita Divi Augusti 64.2-3. (Learning); A. M. Macrobius Saturnalia 2.51-
5.9 (Body, Learning)
Julia (3), daughter of Julia and Agrippa; granddaughter of Augustus (ca.19 BCE-29 CE).
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Vita Divi Augusti 64.2-3 (Learning)
Julia Procilla, mother of Gn. Julius Agricola (1st century CE).
Cornelius Tacitus, Agricola 4.1-4. (Family)
Laelia, wife of Q. Mucius Scaevola (fl. 2nd -1st century BCE).
M. Fabius Quintilianus, Institutio Oratoria 1.1.6 (Learning)
Livia Drusilla, Augusta; wife of Augustus; mother and grandmother of emperors (58 BCE-29 CE).
Cornelius Tacitus, Annales 1.3, V.1 (excerpts) (State, Family)
Lucceia, actress (ca. late 1st century BCE).
C. Plinius Secundus (maior), Naturalis Historia 7.48.158 (Work)
Lydia, one of Horace’s literary girlfriends (late 1st century BCE).
Q. Horatius Flaccus, Carmina 3.9 (Flirtation)
Marcia Aurelia Ceionia Demetrias, public benefactor (2d c. CE).
CIL 10.5918 (State)
Matrona, wife of Menaechmus (early 2nd century BCE).
T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi 602-652 (Marriage)
Melaenis, mother of Selenium; a meretrix (early 2nd century BCE).
T. Maccius Plautus, Cistellaria 38-41, 123-4, 133-44 (Work)
Metilia Acte, priestess and wife of G. Iunius Euhodus (2nd century CE).
CIL 14.371 (Religion)
Minicia Marcella, 13-year-old daughter of Fundanus (ca. 100-110 CE).
C. Plinius Caecilius Secundus (minor), Epistulae 5.16 (Childhood)
Minucia Suavis, daughter of Ti. Claudius Suavis (1st century CE).
CIL 6.22560 (Childhood)
Monica, mother of St. Augustine (4th century CE).
Aurelius Augustinus Hipponensis, Confessiones 9.19 (Marriage)
Murdia, honored daughter, wife, and mother (1st century BCE).
ILS 8394: Laudatio Funebris Murdiae: (excerpts) (Family)
Naevoleia Tyche, wealthy Pompeiian businesswoman and benefactor (1st century CE).
ILS 6373: Funerary Inscription. (Work)
Olympias, painter (n.d.).
C. Plinius Secundus (maior), Naturalis Historia 35.40.147-8 (Work)
Paulina, wife of L. Seneca Minor who nearly ended her life with his suicide (f. mid-1st century CE)
Cornelius Tacitus, Annales XV.63-4 (Marriage)
Perilla, poet, stepdaughter, and literary protθgé of Ovid (fl. early 1st century CE).
P. Ovidius Naso, Tristia 3.7 (Learning)
Petronia Hedone, mother of L. Petronius Philemon (ca. 110-120 CE).
CIL 6.24037 (Class)
Pompeia Plotina Claudia Phoebe Piso, wife of Trajan (d. ca. 121 CE).
C. Plinius Caecilius Secundus (minor), Panegyricus 83 (marriage)
Porcia, wife of M. Junius Brutus (d. 43 BCE).
Valerius Maximus, Facta et Dicta Memorabilia 4.6.5 (Marriage)
Postumia, Vestal Virgin (420 BCE).
T. Livius, Ab Urbe Condita 4.44 (Body)
Pyrrha, elegant meretrix, torment of lovers (1st century BC).
Q. Horatius Flaccus, Carmina 1.
Sammula, actress (n.d).
C. Plinius Secundus (maior), Naturalis Historia 7.48.158 (Work)
Sappho, Greek lyric poet of Lesbos (fl. 6th century BCE).
P. Ovidius Naso, Tristia 3.7 (Learning); M. Valerius Martialis, Epigrammata 10.35 (Marriage)
Scintilla, wife of Habbinas; best friend of Fortunata (mid-1st century CE).
C. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon 37, 67, 76 (excerpts) (Family)
Selenium, daughter of Melaenis; a meretrix (early 2nd century BCE).
T. Maccius Plautus, Cistellaria 38-41, 123-4, 133-44 (Work)
Sempronia, wife of D. Brutus; member of the Catilinarian Conspiracy (fl. 63 BCE).
C. Sallustius Crispus, Bellum Catilinae 24-25 (excerpts) (State)
Silonia, author or victim of a curse (9th century CE)
CIL 13.7550 a, b
Sophonisba, Queen of Numidia, wife of Kings Syphax and Massinissa; committed suicide (203 BCE)
T. Livius, Ab Urbe Condita 30.12 (Marriage)
Sulpicia (1), poet, daughter of Servius Sulpicius Rufus; ward of M. Valerius Messalla Corvinus (fl. late
1st century BCE)
Incertus Auctor, De Sulpicia 1. (Body); Sulpicia, Elegidia 1-6 (Flirtation)
Sulpicia (2), poet, wife of Calenus (fl. late 1st century CE).
Sulpiciae Conquestio lines 7-11 (Learning); M. Valerius Martialis, Epigrammata 10.35, 10.38
(Marriage)
Sulpicia (3), wife of Cornelius Lentullus Cruscellio (fl. mid 1st century BCE).
Valerius Maximus, Facta et Dicta Memorabilia 6.7 (Marriage)
Syra, mother of Gymnasium; a meretrix (early 2nd century BCE).
T. Maccius Plautus, Cistellaria 38-41, 123-4, 133-44 (Work)
Tanaquil, Etruscan-born queen; wife of Tarquinius Priscus (6th century BCE).
T. Livius, Ab Urbe Condita 1.34-41 (excerpts) (State)
Tarpeia, Vestal Virgin (?), daughter of Spurius Tarquinius, Roman commander defending the Capitoline
against a Sabine attack (748 BCE)
Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita I.11 (State)
Terentia, sister of D. Terentius Gentianus (fl. 130 CE).
ILS 1046a: Funerary Inscription for her brother (Family)
Terentia, wife of Cicero (1st century BCE).
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares 14.4, 20 (Family)
Tertia Aemilia, wife of P. Cornelius Scipio Africanus maior (3rd-2nd century BCE).
Valerius Maximus, Facta et Dicta Memorabilia 6.7 (Marriage)
Titia, the name signifies “Jane Doe.”
Gaius, Institutiones 1.144-145, 148-150 (State)
Tretia Maria, victim of a curse (1st century CE)
RIB 7
Tullia, daughter of Cicero and Terentia (79-45 BCE).
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares 14.4, 20 (Family)
Tullia Minor, younger daughter of Servius Tullius; queen; wife of Tarquinius Superbus (fl. 6th century
BCE).
T. Livius, Ab Urbe Condita 1.47-48 (excerpts) (State); 1.46-48, 5 (Family)
Turia, matrona; perhaps also wife of Q. Lucretius Vespillo (1st century BCE).
ILS 8393 “Laudatio Turiae” (excerpts); Valerius Maximus, Facta et Dicta Memorabilia 6.7
(Marriage)
Verginia, founder of the cult of Pudicitia Plebeia, wife of consul L. Volumnius (3rd century BCE).
T. Livius, Ab Urbe Condita 10.23 (Class)
Veturia, mother of Coriolanus ( fl. 493 BCE).
T. Livius, Ab Urbe Condita 2.40 (State)
Violentilla, bride of L. Arruntius Stella (late 1st century CE).
P. Statius, Silvae 1.2. 105-122, 138-140 (Body)
Vistilia, aristocrat; married six times; registered as a public prostitute; exiled for adultery (19 CE).
Cornelius Tacitus, Annales II.85.1-4 (Flirtation)
Volumnia, wife of Coriolanus ( fl. 493 BCE).
T. Livius, Ab Urbe Condita 2.40 (State)

Classical Studies - clarifications of achievement standards and unit standards

AS90250 (2.4) Complete an independent examination of an area of classical studies (v2)

There are many components within this achievement standard. Students need to be able to demonstrate that they are able to examine relevant evidence to reach conclusions. 'Examine' is defined in explanatory note (EN) 4 as selecting, describing and relating evidence to the purpose of investigation.
The examination of 'relevant evidence' has been discussed in the National Moderator's Report for a number of years. EN 2 states that all students need to refer to primary sources and teachers are encouraged to provide appropriate tasks, resources and guidance which allow them to do so.
Greater direction from teachers to include the scope for archaeological, artistic and literary evidence within their assessment materials will allow students more opportunity to examine in detail a range of evidence, a requirement for Excellence.
The selection of sources from the ancient world needs to be relevant to that period and civilisation. There have been many examples where students have incorrectly identified literary and archaeological evidence from the Roman world as primary source evidence from the Greek world. Further guidance from teachers in terms of identifying time period as part of the teaching and learning would prepare students well to select relevant evidence.
The topic of the assessment activity must not be directly studied in class prior to the assessment opportunity and teachers need to be wary of providing too much guidance, either during the research process or through the resources provided to students.
A bibliography is not a requirement of the standard. While teachers can ask that students complete one as part of the authentication process, it should not be reflected in the assessment schedule.

AS90251 (2.5) Communicate knowledge of an aspect of the classical world (v2)

The requirement to 'communicate detailed knowledge with flair' is a requirement for Excellence. Evidence of flair is not restricted to visual evidence only. This can be an effective means of finding evidence to award Excellence but the written work also needs to be considered. Some work that is not visually appealing may still have flair though the written or verbal communication of knowledge. Supporting student work also needs to communicate detailed knowledge at Merit and Excellence levels. Refer to the definitions provided in EN2 of this standard.
Students can work in groups but individual student work needs to be assessed. This could be evidenced through student observations, group log sheets, or conferencing with students to ascertain knowledge of the topic of assessment. Evidence of this needs to be submitted for moderation.
Providing samples to students of the chosen format of presentation for instance, examples of a newspaper layout, a photo essay, a Powerpoint presentation or diary entries which show flair, would assist in ensuring students meet the presentation requirements for this standard.
Spelling and grammatical errors only preclude achievement if they interfere with the students' ability to communicate detailed knowledge.
It is difficult for moderators to see student work meets the national standard if teachers do not submit original material or colour copies of student work. Powerpoint presentations should be submitted on CD in order for the flair of communication, e.g. slide design, colour, animations, and transitions, to be fairly judged against the standard.

AS90514 (3.4) Complete independent research on an area of the classical World (v2)

Relevant evidence needs to be selected. This needs to be indicated in the student work; either via quotations from sources or annotated images of archaeological or artistic work. Other evidence could include a bibliography or clear referencing within the student work, such as endnotes or footnotes. Any referencing is acceptable as long as teachers can locate the sources of evidence. Students need to show evidence of selection; it is insufficient to refer to a whole text from either primary or secondary sources as evidence.
The requirements for a range of evidence at Merit and a wide range of evidence at Excellence are both qualitative and quantitative. Qualitative evidence can include evidence which recognises the complexity of the sources, appreciates the wider context, is aware of the significance or limitations of the sources. This is encouraged as it allows the student more scope to reach conclusions / reach developed conclusions.
At Achieved level, evidence selected and analysed need not include secondary evidence. Primary and secondary sources should be used at Merit and Excellence levels.
Analysis of evidence of both primary and secondary evidence can be through extended written responses but students can analyse the evidence in any format, such as annotated images, bullet pointed explanations or discussions, for example.
As with AS 90250, this assessment requires independent research and the comments above about teacher guidance and pre-teaching of the topic also apply to this standard.

Unit standards in Classical Studies

Unit standards in Classical Studies continue to be used by some schools.
Teachers who are using unit standards need to be aware that the moderation process is as robust as that for achievement standards. Assessment materials need to include:
  • assessment activity
  • assessment schedules - including evidence and judgement statement for each performance criterion (pc)
  • conditions for the assessment.
There are no restrictions on the format or layout of assessment activities. The level of understanding required of students is the same as that expected in achievement standards at the same level.
The special notes on the standard need to be adhered to and should be reflected in the assessment activity. Special notes often state requirements for specific evidence (both primary and secondary), time periods, events or themes to be covered, specifications of texts or the number of artistic works to be covered within the assessment.